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NodeJS and javascript libraries are overwhelming students

I started teaching NodeJS to some of the students in the computer science major at my school (these students know the basics of Java and OOP).

The idea is for them to make a small web project (such as a grades and averages calculator or a display for a timetable etc.) using javascript.

I plan to teach about javascript, client-server separation, http requests etc. The main problem is the vast number of JS libraries in existence. I intend to emphasize that most of the code is already written. E.g. the code for creating nice graphs exists in charts-js, and responsive client side frameworks (angular, react) exist.

This project is also meant to teach the notion that programmers rarely write programs from scratch, and that they should often see if there exists a library\framework that give a functionality they need.

However, with Javascript, the vast number of libraries makes it somewhat difficult to know which ones to pick. It's not impossible, but I'd rather students not waste time on that.

I ran this by a handful of students, to see whether students actually get overwhelmed. From what I saw, students are likely to waste time reading up about the library they are checking (somewhat like reading a review for a PC before buying it). Research is great, but the amount of wasted time was quite big.

So, what can I do to teach them how to "sniff" the "correct" library more efficiently? In other words, how can I teach them which metrics are significant (and why those metrics are important) when deciding whether a library is useful? Bearing in mind that the time it takes is to be considered, I'd prefer ways and metrics that are generally faster (a metric such ase.g. reading up the documentation of a library is somewhat slower when compared to checking npm's download in the last day is somewhat useful, but not the only thing to check)


1Unless they program in Scratch.



Tags: ,,

NodeJS and javascript libraries are overwhelming students

I started teaching NodeJS to some of the students in the computer science major at my school (these students know the basics of Java and OOP).

The idea is for them to make a small web project (such as a grades and averages calculator or a display for a timetable etc.) using javascript.

I plan to teach about javascript, client-server separation, http requests etc. The main problem is the vast number of JS libraries in existence. I intend to emphasize that most of the code is already written. E.g. the code for creating nice graphs exists in charts-js, and responsive client side frameworks (angular, react) exist.

This project is also meant to teach the notion that programmers rarely write programs from scratch, and that they should often see if there exists a library\framework that give a functionality they need.

However, with Javascript, the vast number of libraries makes it somewhat difficult to know which ones to pick. It's not impossible, but I'd rather students not waste time on that.

So, what can I do to teach them how to "sniff" the "correct" library? In other words, how can I teach them which metrics are significant (and why those metrics are important) when deciding whether a library is useful (a metric such as npm's download in the last day is somewhat useful, but not the only thing to check)


1Unless they program in Scratch.



Tags: ,,

NodeJS and javascript libraries are overwhelming students

I started teaching NodeJS to some of the students in the computer science major at my school (these students know the basics of Java and OOP).

The idea is for them to make a small web project (such as a grades and averages calculator or a display for a timetable etc.) using javascript.

I plan to teach about javascript, client-server separation, http requests etc. The main problem is the vast number of JS libraries in existence. I intend to emphasize that most of the code is already written. E.g. the code for creating nice graphs exists in charts-js, and responsive client side frameworks (angular, react) exist.

This project is also meant to teach the notion that programmers rarely write programs from scratch, and that they should often see if there exists a library\framework that give a functionality they need.

However, with Javascript, the vast number of libraries makes it somewhat difficult to know which ones to pick. It's not impossible, but I'd rather students not waste time on that.

I ran this by a handful of students, to see whether students actually get overwhelmed. From what I saw, students are likely to waste time reading up about the library they are checking (somewhat like reading a review for a PC before buying it). Research is great, but the amount of wasted time was quite big.

So, what can I do to teach them how to "sniff" the "correct" library more efficiently? In other words, how can I teach them which metrics are significant (and why those metrics are important) when deciding whether a library is useful? Bearing in mind that the time it takes is to be considered, I'd prefer ways and metrics that are generally faster (e.g. reading up the documentation of a library is somewhat slower when compared to checking npm's download in the last day)


1Unless they program in Scratch.



Tags: ,,

1
source | link

NodeJS and javascript libraries are overwhelming students

I started teaching NodeJS to some of the students in the computer science major at my school (these students know the basics of Java and OOP).

The idea is for them to make a small web project (such as a grades and averages calculator or a display for a timetable etc.) using javascript.

I plan to teach about javascript, client-server separation, http requests etc. The main problem is the vast number of JS libraries in existence. I intend to emphasize that most of the code is already written. E.g. the code for creating nice graphs exists in charts-js, and responsive client side frameworks (angular, react) exist.

This project is also meant to teach the notion that programmers rarely write programs from scratch, and that they should often see if there exists a library\framework that give a functionality they need.

However, with Javascript, the vast number of libraries makes it somewhat difficult to know which ones to pick. It's not impossible, but I'd rather students not waste time on that.

So, what can I do to teach them how to "sniff" the "correct" library? In other words, how can I teach them which metrics are significant (and why those metrics are important) when deciding whether a library is useful (a metric such as npm's download in the last day is somewhat useful, but not the only thing to check)


1Unless they program in Scratch.



Tags: ,,

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