15

Teaching about the field of computer science is also a part of teaching computer science, so I have no problem with it. It is also not that dissimilar from this question, so I think that we've already demonstrated some community acceptance of this kind of coverage on the site.


6

Teachers and administrators frequently have to explain to parents exactly what it is they're teaching or want to teach and in some cases are forced to justify their in class choices to parents. Likewise I know plenty of students who've had to explain to parents what it is I was teaching so that the parents saw it of equal or greater value than alternatives (...


6

My instinct is that the meta discussion that Aurora pointed to is spot-on. As long as the comment is about the “process of teaching or learning mathematics computer science” (with the key word there being process), then I believe that such a question would be welcomed by the community here. Truthfully, as a teacher, I could certainly learn from such a ...


5

I wouldn't consider internet safety a Computer Science topic. Computer science is generally regarded as: the science that deals with the theory and methods of processing information in digital computers, the design of computer hardware and software, and the applications of computers. In the UK, at least, internet safety would certainly not be a Computer ...


5

I don't see a need to preference CSTA over any other organization, though it seems like some of their definitions could be very useful for us, either by overt adoption, or as starting points. (ie. if they change their definition, that should not change ours by default.) Obviously, our interests and theirs have an extreme amount of overlap. However, I am ...


4

Questions about designing a curriculum or finding learning resources for yourself are likely on-topic here. There haven't been many questions to test whether they're well-received yet, but there is a self-learning tag on the site, with 3 questions as of writing. Without more details, I would guess that yes, your question would fit here. Feel free to edit ...


3

Questions like this are topical here under the self-learning tag, though the question you've quoted is far too broad. If OP wants help on how to cement his understanding of variables, or of constructors, or anything specific, OP can come and ask and we will direct them towards resources or exercises.


3

I am perplexed about why this was closed in the first place, as I don't see how it can be a question about aesthetics at all. Colors in a block-based language are an aspect of how organizing principles of code are communicated. A quick look at Snap! shows that these colors are not simply to be pretty, but rather to allow someone to easily be able to follow ...


3

If topics that are included in the CSTA standards or the Computer Science standards adopted at state levels (and many states are writing their own CS standards) are off-topic here then I feel you will not get participation from educators at the K-5 or K-8 levels. If we want to broaden participation and include educators below the high school level, then I ...


2

I'm actually going to dissent a little here. I do think the question needs refinement to gain specificity. However, consider the seven "Big Ideas" of the AP Computer Science Principles curriculum: Creativity Abstraction Data and Information Algorithms Programming The Internet Global Impact It seems that the way this discussion is going, some elements of ...


2

While teaching computer skills can be very valuable, I don't see it as an expression of computer science. According to Wikipedia: Computer science is the study of the theory, experimentation, and engineering that form the basis for the design and use of computers. It is the scientific and practical approach to computation and its applications and the ...


2

After a group discussion, we decided that we were unclear about OPs intentions, as there were multiple possible readings of the question. We discussed two possibilities: OP was asking about color choices specifically OP was asking about how to logically group commands by color in order to enhance student understanding. In the case of (1), this question ...


2

The CSTA standards have undergone another revision to more closely align with the K-12 Computer Science Framework and will be released this summer. The Framework might give you some insight into the vision for K-12 Computer Science in the US.


2

I'm against defining this site's scope based on some definition from a US association. Too volatile, susceptible to change as governments and lobby groups come and go and interests change. Also, pretty meaningless in the rest of the world, or for anyone not among their 25000 members. Computer science is pretty well definable, so I say we should go with the ...


2

The question, "Do some websites block school building/classroom IP networks because they mistake us for possible DDOS?" is one I consider on topic for Computer Science Educators. Here are my thoughts: If a goal of the site is to provide answers to CS Educators, from CS Educators, about CS Educators' problems, then we need to be aware of two possible ...


2

This isn't CS, it is CSEducators. It is about how to teach, not what to teach, primarily, with a focus on CS. We want to teach the "right thing". But if you teach it badly you aren't doing your students any favors and may, in fact, be standing in their way. I think the balance here is fine. Even the question cited is about interpersonal relationships (...


2

I'll just go though point by point and give my thoughts: [From Math.SE]: "Seeking personal advice. Questions about choosing a course, academic program, career path, etc. are off-topic. Such questions should be directed to those employed by the institution in question, or other qualified individuals who know your specific circumstances." These are already ...


1

In addition to @GypsySpellweaver's quite articulate (and persuasive!) answer, I would also add that within our own site scope, answers could relevantly include classroom management solutions to dealing with such problems. I consider the question to be within our scope as well.


1

The question goes beyond parents. Some people here teach short courses, often to adults in, say, the local library. The techniques needed may be different from those of teaching a typical class in secondary or undergraduate. So, I'd say yes to scope, but rephrased to elicit the pedagogy that works. Of course parents are a bit different since you have an ...


1

Teaching the purpose/value of CS is fundamental to getting more parents to appreciate the value of a CS background. That is an important step to getting the right students involved in CS early (and in improving diversity). So although the context of the quoted question is a little off (student to parent), the question of normalising CS so everyone ...


1

I've been going back and forth on this question. I originally voted to close because I saw this less as a pedagogical discussion and more of a UX one. The design of an app for use in the classroom, while educational in the end, is initially about user experience; it just so happens that the users in this case are students. That fact doesn't necessarily make ...


1

I'll share my perspective, having just edited it and nominated it for re-opening. I do think the question has merit because it is addressing an important issue in any discipline: how to keep all students intellectually stimulated and challenged. Obviously, that phenomenon is not unique to CS; there are overachievers in any course who work faster and/or who ...


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